Nice going, Ryan. You cheated. You got caught. And you took a powder on the rest of the season and abandoned your teammates. Personally I hope you never play another game.
Alex Rodriguez – A-Roid – the poster child of Major League Baseball’s Second Steroid Era, hasn’t played a game yet this season and probably won’t, if the Yankees have anything to say about it. A-Roid gives good lip service to wanting to get back out there on the field and help his beloved Yankees win another championship.
The problem with that notion is the last time Alex was on a baseball field, in the 2012 playoffs, he couldn’t hit sand if he fell off a camel and watched from the top of the dugout steps. Age and his deteriorating body had failed him.
The performance enhancing drugs was the glue holding his body together and now that he can’t use them his body is literally falling apart.
Good.
A-Roid, I hope you never play another game. The Yankee dream of bringing baseball’s career home run title back to New York just grew wings and flew out the window because it’s not going to happen. Rodriguez has 647 career home runs and sits in fifth place behind Willie Mays’ 660 big flies. He will never hit number 648.
Cheating is any act designed to give one competitor an unfair advantage over the other. A runner on second stealing the catcher’s signs and relaying them to the hitter by way of hand signals is cheating.
Scuffing up a baseball – cheating. Corking a baseball bat – cheating. Throwing a spitball – cheating.
Chucking back a Starbuck’s triple shot espressos (well stirred) before game six of a seven game road trip because it’s nearly August and you are dog tired, that’s cheating too.
Nearly every NBA locker room has an espresso machine somewhere in it, and it’s not because Metta World Peace likes to enjoy a little Italian Espresso Roast after a tough game. It’s for the caffeine shot.
The best thing to do in regard to hooking a much needed caffeine buzz was to take a pinch of coffee grounds and stick it between your cheek and gum. I was doing cartwheels by the fourth inning.
In a round table discussion a couple years back involving Willie Mays, Tim McCarver, Bob Gibson and Bob Costas, Mays said he wasn’t sure he wouldn’t have tried steroids if they were made available to him. They weren’t and it’s a moot point but Mays was speaking honestly.
Bob Gibson had the best reply, opting to deal with issues the way baseball players like to deal with issues, on the field.
He said, “I want to face Barry Bonds with all his body armor, leaning in over the plate like that.”
Gibson just smiled when asked to expand on his remarks. Gibson was famous for the high and tight fastball.
Maybe that’s what baseball should do in regard to PEDs.
Let Ryan Braun suit up like Iron Man and step up to the plate against Craig Kimbrel. Chin music seems to be the only thing that gets baseball players’ attention. 
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Finding Mudville: On cheating

  • Wednesday, July 31, 2013

With the Milwaukee Brewers 19.5 games out of first place in the National League’s Central Division, mega-millionaire and former MVP Ryan Braun decided to throw in the towel and serve out a 60-game suspension while forfeiting $3.5 million for his part in the Biogenesis scandal and performance enhancing drugs.
Nice going, Ryan. You cheated. You got caught. And you took a powder on the rest of the season and abandoned your teammates. Personally I hope you never play another game.
Alex Rodriguez – A-Roid – the poster child of Major League Baseball’s Second Steroid Era, hasn’t played a game yet this season and probably won’t, if the Yankees have anything to say about it. A-Roid gives good lip service to wanting to get back out there on the field and help his beloved Yankees win another championship.
The problem with that notion is the last time Alex was on a baseball field, in the 2012 playoffs, he couldn’t hit sand if he fell off a camel and watched from the top of the dugout steps. Age and his deteriorating body had failed him.
The performance enhancing drugs was the glue holding his body together and now that he can’t use them his body is literally falling apart.
Good.
A-Roid, I hope you never play another game. The Yankee dream of bringing baseball’s career home run title back to New York just grew wings and flew out the window because it’s not going to happen. Rodriguez has 647 career home runs and sits in fifth place behind Willie Mays’ 660 big flies. He will never hit number 648.
Cheating is any act designed to give one competitor an unfair advantage over the other. A runner on second stealing the catcher’s signs and relaying them to the hitter by way of hand signals is cheating.
Scuffing up a baseball – cheating. Corking a baseball bat – cheating. Throwing a spitball – cheating.
Chucking back a Starbuck’s triple shot espressos (well stirred) before game six of a seven game road trip because it’s nearly August and you are dog tired, that’s cheating too.
Nearly every NBA locker room has an espresso machine somewhere in it, and it’s not because Metta World Peace likes to enjoy a little Italian Espresso Roast after a tough game. It’s for the caffeine shot.
The best thing to do in regard to hooking a much needed caffeine buzz was to take a pinch of coffee grounds and stick it between your cheek and gum. I was doing cartwheels by the fourth inning.
In a round table discussion a couple years back involving Willie Mays, Tim McCarver, Bob Gibson and Bob Costas, Mays said he wasn’t sure he wouldn’t have tried steroids if they were made available to him. They weren’t and it’s a moot point but Mays was speaking honestly.
Bob Gibson had the best reply, opting to deal with issues the way baseball players like to deal with issues, on the field.
He said, “I want to face Barry Bonds with all his body armor, leaning in over the plate like that.”
Gibson just smiled when asked to expand on his remarks. Gibson was famous for the high and tight fastball.
Maybe that’s what baseball should do in regard to PEDs.
Let Ryan Braun suit up like Iron Man and step up to the plate against Craig Kimbrel. Chin music seems to be the only thing that gets baseball players’ attention. 

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