Dexcter Mack

  • Monday, February 18, 2013

Dexcter Mack PHOTO BY JUDY WATTS

Photos

Plain and simple, Dexcter Mack is a guy with his heart in the right place.
“Dexcter is a good Samaritan who provides material benefits to needy families, many times out of his own pocket,” Summerville Town Councilman Aaron Brown said in his letter nominating Mack for Men to Watch. “He will give you the shirt off his back. He personally checks on the seniors in our community and even brings them gifts on their birthdays.”
Mack's king-size heart developed early.
“Every since I was a child I was close with my grandfather and he taught me a lot,” Mack said. “I've always modeled my life after his and tried to do the right thing and tried to make a difference. … When I was 11 I knew it was predestined for me to serve my community. I've always enjoyed being in my community so I want to make a difference in the lives of others there.”
Also at a relatively early age, he entered the workforce. When he was 15 the Summerville native took a customer service job at Woodlands Resort. After eight years, he moved on to his current job as an administrative clerk for the Dorchester County Auditor's Office. There he sometimes has to deal with irate taxpayers who are upset about their bill or the taxation process, but his background helped prepare him to take them in stride.
“Customer service isn't for everyone,” he said. “Not everyone can deal with people all the time but God blessed me with that gift. It's all about empathizing. In anything you do, the key is to listen to people. Once you do that then you can give them the best answer to their question or help them find a solution to their problem. … Whether I'm at work or somewhere else, I try to take myself out of the equation and make sure I'm working for others.”
While he is only 33, Mack has been in on the ground floor for several philanthropic endeavors.
In November he founded the new Summerville NAACP Branch and he now serves as chapter president.
“I noticed the chapter had not been active for a while and I felt like we needed to get it back on track so I called the state headquarters and asked them what we needed to do to restart the chapter,” he said. “The NAACP looks out for the welfare of all people, not just African Americans. Our chapter wants to make sure we are the voice for the voiceless and that everyone is treated fairly and that someone is being held accountable because every once in a while you will have that little devil that isn't doing the right thing.”
In a short time, Mack obtained more than the needed number of members to found the branch.
“It was easy,” he said. “People were happy to send their checks in because they wanted a chapter here. The organization does so much. It helps children, puts on SAT seminars and supports a wide range of other projects that make a positive impact.”
For National Day of Service, the branch found 10 seniors throughout the Summerville area and helped them with whatever their greatest need was.
Recently, Mack spearheaded the founding of a local NAACP Youth Chapter.
Mack is a founder and chairman of the Councilman's Ball, an organization that honors local citizens who have made a positive impact on their community.
“Councilman's Ball is my baby,” he said. “We use it to honor people who do a lot of great things, but never get recognition for it. While it started off small, I've watched it grow into something big.”
The charity now has 15 members on its board of directors. The annual ball attracts 300 to 400 guests. Proceeds helped fund five scholarships for local high school students last year.
Mack is also president of the District One Civic Association. The organization holds monthly meetings to ensure sure citizens are informed about issues that may affect their community and to receive feedback regarding any needs the community faces.
“It is always good to get together and discuss how things are going whether things are good or bad,” Mack said. “Senior citizens and children are the two things I'm concerned about the most. I have always loved the seniors in my community and I am a big advocate of us coming together and finding more resources for our younger people. We need a community center and extra curricular activities that all young people can participate in. We need to find things that will intrigue our younger people.”

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